Finger Painting Orcas and Crumpled Paper Art

I’ve been soooo quiet lately in the blogging/instagraming world lately. Lots have been happening with this little family the last few weeks and compounded with GORGEOUS summer weather, we are hardly at home! Then…I started POTTY TRAINING with N. That means: All HANDS on DECK! Anyhoo, long story short, we hardly had time to do much arts and craft!

Last week, my uncle asked if J can help draw or paint an orca for his FB banner. Unfortunately for uncle T, J’s main subjects for painting and drawings are rockets and dinosaurs. Even then, they sometimes look like amoebas đŸ˜‰ I also (jokingly) offered to draw him an “ugly” whale if he wants something whimsical and child-like.

Even hubby made a submission….not bad! But it’s not a killer whale…

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To build up the children’s existing interest in these marine mammals, we hired out a few library books on whales, orcas, and dolphins. We learned that orcas are a type of dolphin! It’s not a whale!

They loved reading Humphrey The Lost Whale. It’s a true story about a humpback whale which deviated from his usual Mexico to Alaska migration by entering the San Francisco Bay. In fact, he got “lost” twice! Once in 1985 and another time in 1990.

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We also watched Meatball (aka Nemo) a few times….even saw a Nemo fish at the mall!

Who’s that behind you Dory and Marlin??

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Where’s Meatball?

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Orca Arts and Craft

What you’ll need:

  • Construction paper – white, dark blue, light blue, pink/orange
  • Paint – black and white
  • Sponge
  • Cotton ball
  • Black pen
  • Scissors
  • Glue

First, I  handed the kids some light blue paper to crumple. The more crumpled the better. Then I asked them to flatten the paper out with some assistance from mummy. Once it’s flattened, I had the kids lightly paint over the paper with sponges and white paint. This makes it look like snow.

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While we are waiting for the mountains to dry, I drew some orcas with a black pen. Then I asked the kids to fill in the BLACK part of the whale with their fingers using a dotting technique. I figure this is better than using a brush since they always end up using their hands when they’re painting.

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Looks pretty good! For N, she’s younger, so I helped guide her hands to where we want the paint to go.

Once the mountains were dry, I cut the paper into mountain landscapes.

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Then glue the landscape on top of an orange or pink piece of construction paper that will become your sunset sky.

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Then I tore the blue construction paper width-wise to make the ocean.

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Glue that underneath your mountains.

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Then glue your orca onto the picture.

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Take a cotton ball and dab a little bit of white paint onto the picture to make it look like waves and splashes in the picture. If your child is older, they can help tear/cut the paper, and dab the white paint.

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And voila!

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National Sorry Day, Australia – Aboriginal Art – Dot Painting

May 26 is National Sorry Day in Australia. It has been an annual event since 1997 to remember and atone for policies that ripped 50,000 Aboriginal children from their families, resulting in a “Stolen Generation.”

Image from GetUp , a not-for-profit organisation. See link for more information on National Sorry Day.

I thought today would be the perfect day for the kids (and myself haha) to try dot painting!

Image from Kirkland Museum.

Dot painting is a traditional visual form of storytelling by the Aborigines of Australia. Natural canvas such as leaves, bark and wood are painted with paint made of sand, ochre, and seeds. Paintings often depict elaborate patterns and symbols. These symbols often help create Dreamtime stories which taught about life and Creation. To read more about Dreamtime stories, the origins of Aboriginal Dot Painting, or to see more examples of Dot Painting, visit:

Didges We Doo

National Museum of Australia

Kate Owen Gallery

For our dot painting lesson, we’ll need:

  • Q-tips (cotton swabs or sticks)
  • Paint (we stuck with our Crayola Washable Paints but acrylics is preferred)
  • Construction paper (or you can use leaves, rocks, tree bark, etc)
  • Didgeridoo music

For our little gnomes, I first showed them some pictures of dot painting on the laptop. I explained to them the origins of dot painting and how the paintings were used by Aboriginal elders to tell stories to children. Then I found some symbols used in Aboriginal art.

Aboriginal Art Graphic Symbols and Meanings

Image from Aboriginal Art Shop

aboriginal symbols

Image from Didges We Doo

Then I drew an outline of a sea turtle on each of their white construction paper

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Then I helped demonstrate and explain the technique behind dot painting. Tell your child to gently dip their Q-tip in their paint and dot along the outline of their picture. If you push too hard, the dot will be wider. Keep your Q-tip as straight as possible or your dots will look more like inconsistent blobs. đŸ™‚ This is a great way to practice our fine motor skills! It does take some concentration.

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So far so good….

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Uh oh! The temptation to use our fingers and hands was too great!

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Well, that escalated quickly!

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Haha I wonder what story this tells….of poor sea turtle.

Managed to save one. Here’s the unsullied version of a fish and an Aboriginal symbol for “meeting place.”

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Earth Day – Crumpled Recycled Paper Art Project

It may be hard to teach young toddlers the concept of Earth Day and recycling, but there are way to get them accustomed and familiar to it. Our kids usually comes with us when we take the rubbish out since it’s on the way to the elevators.

We have two garbage shoots. One is for general waste and one for recycling. They really enjoy helping us throw empty plastic bottles, paper, cardboard, etc down the garbage shoot. Near our mailboxes, there is also a recycle bin for junk mail (paper). They love helping me recycle the junk mail đŸ™‚ Imagine your kids fighting over hot deals from Safeway.

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Today I wanted to do an Earth Day art project using up some of our used construction paper. They were previously used to doodle on.

Materials:

  • Used and/or new construction paper (Black, Blue, Green, Brown)
  • Scissors
  • Paint (White, Green, Brown)
  • Sponge (or paint brushes)
  • Glue
  • Sticky tape
  • Toothbrush

Music / Videos:

I looked up recycling music and found some goodies on YouTube!

Jack Johnson: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

Going Green Song (Reduce, Reuse, Recycle)

Tom Chapin: Recycle Song

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I tried to find the biggest circle template to fit the paper. I ended up using a tupperware lid. Trace the large circle onto your blue paper. You will use this circle as your planet earth.

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Then I did a quick Google search for an image of earth. I searched for the Americas. You can choose your own view of earth of course!

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I found this from Fine Art America. I only used this image to help me draw my version of the Americas (no where as nice haha). You will see it further down the process.

Draw your continent onto a brown or green paper. Cut out your continents.

Have your child decorate the black paper with stars! We used an old toothbrush. Dip the toothbrush in white paint and spray paint the stars onto the black paper. Help little ones as they might not have the dexterity to do so. I had them hold the brush with one hand and scrape the brush head with the other hand’s thumb. Or you can guide them with your hands.

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After they’re happy with their stars, put it aside to dry and hand them their blue circles and brown/green continents to crumple! Take care NOT to rip the paper!

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After they are nicely crumpled, you can paint over them with your sponges or brushes.

With your blue planet, you will want to use the white paint to make clouds and storms! Tell your littlies that it is OK not to have your planet completely covered because you want to leave gaps for the ocean!

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Once they are done painting clouds, set these aside to dry and start painting the continents.

If you have a brown continent, you will want to use green paint. If you have a green continent, you will want to use brown.

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We didn’t have any brown paint, so I mixed yellow with purple. You can basically mix any primary color with its complementary color. Other colors you can mix: blue + orange; red + green

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Once these are done, set these aside to dry as well.

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While waiting for them to dry, I’ve cut out 3 arrows for each planet to represent the 3 Rs of recycling: reduce, reuse, recycle.

Once everything is dry, glue your blue planet onto the black starry backdrop. Then glue your continent onto your planet. Have it at an angle so it looks like it’s on it’s axial tilt. More realistic that way! To geek out your kids, you can explain that the Earth’s axis is tilted at an angle of 23.5° away from the plane of the ecliptic. And it’s because of this tilt that we have seasons here on Earth! Whether you’re tilted towards or away from the sun! Ok, quick lesson over.

To finish the project off, I glued and taped my arrows (with a twist to make it 3-D and look more like the recycling symbol). I wrote the 3 R’s of Recycling on each arrow.

Note my initial typo….”reduce, reuCe, recycle.” The horror!!

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OK fixed!

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Mummy brains….

Happy EARTH DAY everyone! Please teach our children to help look after our beautiful planet.

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Easter Activities for Toddlers

Easter is just around the corner and we’ve been busy doing lots of Easter activities and artwork! Here are a few things we did the last couple of weeks.

1. Egg Rolling and Animal Figurine Tracks

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I got this idea from  marble painting. With marble painting, you take marbles, dip them in paint, drop them in a paper-lined tray and move the tray around to paint your picture! So instead of marbles, we used boiled eggs! You can probably use craft eggs as well.

Our kids shared a single tray so this was a collaborative art project. Instead of moving the tray around, we used little cocktail stirrers to move the eggs around.

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For the stamping activity, we thought it’d be a lot of fun to use our animal and dinosaur figurines to stamp eggs on paper!

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Our kids love getting paint all over their hands and paint with their fingers/hands. So I usually let them go crazy with less structure at the end of our project. It allows them to practice following instructions and also let their creative juices go wild.

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2. Bobbing for Easter Eggs

It’s only the start of Spring here in California and it’s been warm!! So I thought it’d be a great day to let the kids with with water! Let go bobbing for eggs!

Instead of using your mouth with apples, I handed the kids some spoons. Great way to practice their fine motor skills!

Again, we used craft eggs. These were purchased from Michaels and they are kind of like ping pong balls. Very light and hallow. They float, making them perfect for this activity.

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I also colored the water with some food coloring to make it more festive haha

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It wasn’t long before they got in!!! Surprised?

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3. Easter Stamp Art – using toilet paper rolls and cotton balls

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Easter Egg – Eggshell Mosaic

1. Easter Eggs – eggshell Mosaic 

I really want the kids to try egg decorating this year but I’m not quite sure if they have the patience or dexterity to do it just yet. I still might try!!

Meanwhile, I’ve been breaking a lot of eggs lately (for breakfast). On top of that, the kids saw an episode of Mister Maker where he made a pretty mosaic out of dyed eggshells. The only thing I noticed is that he didn’t use vinegar! Vinegar helps the color stick to the shells more permanently (and vibrantly as I had noticed). Also he used brown eggshells where I used white. I just figured it’d look more vibrant with my pastel food color gels.

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Here are my CLEANED eggshells. Try and get rid of all the papery membrane inside the shells.

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I crushed the shells (by hand or with a metal spoon) and added them to separate bowls of food coloring + water + vinegar. I eyeballed it but you can probably do about 3 drops of gel with 1/4 cup of water and 1 tbsp of vinegar. I put in more drops of the pink one to achieve the color I wanted so it’s adjustable! I soaked them overnight to get a deep pastel color. It’s up to you what color you want to achieve!

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After I was happy with the coloring, I drained the liquid out and dried the shells in trays lined with paper towels. I sat mine at a sunny windowsill. Make sure you don’t forget them and they might fade a bit under the sun! Check on the regularly and make sure they are dried completely.

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After they are dried, I broke the pieces up some more so it’s like confetti. It’s easier for toddlers to sprinkle than to glue the shells piece by piece. It’s totally up to you! The benefit of smaller pieces is that there are less gaps. Older kids would be better at gluing larger mosaic shell tiles and filling the gaps.

I helped my kids to paint the glue onto the egg I drew for them (with a very easy pattern or design). J wanted to paint himself so I let him but it was going everywhere so I ended up wiping the bits that went outside the lines and finished painting it for him.

I said “paint” the glue because I colored the glue with a little bit of tempera paint. Just to add a bit of coloring to the background đŸ™‚ You don’t have to of course. Your glue will just dry clear which will still look great!

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After your child is done with one section / color, pick up the artwork and give it a little shake to rid of any loose shells. You or your child can patch up the gaps. Then start with another color / section.

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Even mummy got into it!

I used a decorative egg I had bought from the shops and did the same thing.

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Mine had a bit of gap in it since I used bigger shell tiles. I thought it looked pretty neat that way. I might try one with smaller pieces later on.

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Cardboard Dinosaur Cave

More Dinosaur FUN! We have had a few deliveries from online vitamin shops and Amazon lately which usually come with a good size box and tons of brown construction paper. I knew it’d be a waste to just recycle them and/or use the box as my recycling bin…. Light bulb moment: A dinosaur cave for the kids to pretend play with! So after looking on Pinterest a bit and using whatever creative juices I had left with this mummy brain of mine….I came up with this!

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My biggest challenge was finding the time to do this fun project. I had so many ideas but I lacked the patience and wanted to get this done. I figure I can always add to it later on or just build another one and call this the ‘test pilot’. I’ve had this material for two weeks already and I just want to get this to a playable state!

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What I used:

  • A good sized box – spacious enough for your dinosaurs to play in
  • Brown butcher paper or construction paper – you get a lot of these from deliveries or buy them at Lowes, Home Depot, Bunnnings, or any art supply stores
  • Tape
  • Stapler – up to you. You might worry about little fingers getting pricked by a loose staple
  • Hot glue gun & glue stick
  • Egg carton – brown preferred but you can paint them
  • Rocks, leaves, bones (homemade), dinosaurs, etc

I would have loved getting craft felt to line the floor of the cave. You can even use some craft moss or fake grass depending on budget. I was thinking of gluing dried used coffee grinds as an idea. But if you read my Homemade Sand blog entry, you’d know I have trouble accumulating enough coffee grinds in a reasonable amount of time!

I’d love to make a little plateau or hill with the egg carton lid as well. Cover it with mache to blend into the backdrop. Another idea was to create an anchialine pool (aka cave pond).

Later on, I’d like to make an erupting volcano to accompany this cave on a dinosaur playing sort of day!

I didn’t have a chance to document this project with too many photos.

I simply crumpled the construction paper up to a shape I liked and started adhering it to the box to make it look like a cave. My little man helped supervise telling if it looked good or not haha. I used stapler, tape and glue gun to complete the project. I would have loved to make use of paper mache to harden the lining and the cover of the box but I lacked time and patience đŸ˜‰

In this photo, I’m making stalactites out of the pointy bit inside an egg carton. Use hot glue so it sticks more easily.

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I left the remainder of an egg carton inside the cave for the kids to play with. N was pretending her little dinosaur was eating one of the egg cups đŸ™‚

J said they were dino eggs!

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Then I put my premade dinosaur bones inside the cave along with the more lively dinosaurs.

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The kids loved it!

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I’ve been wanting to do a Dinosaur themed day for the kids and I will definitely incorporate this awesome cave into it. Hopefully I’ll find some time to incorporate some of those upgrades I had mentioned!!

St Patrick’s Day – 5 fun activities with toddlers

1. Leprechaun’s Gold Hunt

I did a simple activity with the kids searching for piles of gold our little leprechaun friend has hidden in our house.

I cut up some green clover stickers

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Then I made a little rainbow pompom and green clover trail that the leprechaun has left behind.

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Then hid piles of gold

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Easy, simple and lots of fun for the kiddies. They loved counting their loot!

2. St Patrick’s Day Edible Sensory Bin

Our kids. No, KIDS love jelly (aka jello). Bonus: it’s got a color for EVERY occasion! Green jelly it is!

What I’ve added into our St Patrick’s Day sensory bin:

  • Green Jello
  • Whipped Cream
  • Green sprinkles
  • Marshmallows
  • Gold coins (we used chocolate gold coins – none was eaten though)

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Instructions: Put everything together and let them go nuts! It is a bit of a sugary treat. So be warned if you worry about having hyperactive children in the house! Yet, what’s the big deal if it’s only once in a while if you can allow it? I, personally am borderline diabetic so I’ll be watching THEM with a careful eye they don’t “sample” too much!

A good tip is to feed them right before the activity so they’re less likely to gorge themselves with sugars and lollies!

Another good tip is to let your child know they can only taste 1 of each (limit is up to you of course). J was really good about that and N was just not interested in tasting!

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The first sampling haha

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Josh found all the coins and sorted them. We also counted his loot together

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We even tried to stack the marshmallows. Do you want to build a snowman?

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Then Josh wanted to make small bowls of Leprechaun breakfast.

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3. Rainbow Pot of Gold – mosaic using paint sample tiles

If you child need some guidance with the rainbow colors, I’d start them off by putting a few color tiles on the paper for them. I even showed the kids pictures of rainbows on my laptop as a visual example. You can even draw lines across the page so the kids know where to glue their tiles in. Label each line with the colors of the rainbow if you are teaching them to read.

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4. Green Puffy Paint Shamrocks and Mosaic Shamrocks

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Instructions can be found here in our previous post.

5. Attend Local St Patrick’s Day Festivities

We live in Dublin, California and they have an annual St Patrick’s Day celebration. This will be the city’s 32nd annual festivity and it will be held on the weekend of March 14, 15 (10 AM – 5 PM) we are really looking forward to all the fun!

Festival, parade and other details can be found at the Dublin official website.

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